fantasy

ARC Review of Ripped Pages by M. Hollis

rippedpages1

rippedpages1.jpg

Ripped Pages by M. Hollis

Publication Date: September 22, 2017.

Publisher: Independently published.

Genres: Retellings, Romance, Young Adult, LGBT, and Fantasy.

Rating: 587264602.png587264602.png587264602.png587264602.png

Purchase here: Amazon | GumRoad

Synopsis: Princess Valentina lives a reasonably comfortable life, but after her mother’s death, her father gets tired of taking care of her and locks her in a tower. She spends years on her own, talking to the birds on her windowsill, and reading books with adventures she will never experience. Her plans of running away are usually left for another day because she knows the vast forest surrounding her tower is too dangerous to cross alone.

Until one day, another girl passes by on her horse and Valentina wonders if she’s finally brave enough to seize her chance of freedom.

Ripped Pages is a Rapunzel F/F retelling in the format of a novelette.

galaxyreview

Thank you, Maria Hollis, for my ARC of Ripped Pages. I received this ARC in exchange for an honest review; this does not affect my opinion. Any quotes mentioned below are taken from the ARC and are subject to change upon publication.

Ripped Pages is a beautiful story that feels fresh, unique, and absolutely perfect. This f/f fairytale feels modern and timeless at the same and is a retelling of the classic story of Rapunzel. Ripped Pages is a short and quick read with only about 60 pages and I do think a lot of people will fall in love with it.

Once upon a time, in a land far, far away, lived a princess whose name was Valentina. She had long golden hair that her maids loved to take care of because of its beauty and softness. When she laughed, her plump cheeks turned a delightful shade of pink, and her bright green eyes were always lit with excitement over every little thing.

I love how this book was a retelling of Rapunzel yet it had unexpected twists that made it its own. Moreover, this fairytale retelling is diverse and just what I feel is needed in young adult literature. Ripped Pages is filled with cute and precious moments yet still deals with important and heavy topics that are in no way brushed over. These heavy topics are addressed in the beginning of the story in a clear trigger warning. Despite not being able to speak on these matters with authority, I do felt that the way they were handled were in a good way that felt appropriate for the story that was being told. However, like the author mentioned in her TW, proceed with caution since you know yourself the best.

Ripped Pages is a beautiful, soft, and romantic f/f story and is perfect for anyone looking for a book about a girl who after a long time of hardship finally gets her own chance at a happy ending. The main character Valentina is young and has found books as an escape, and throughout this story, she comes to terms with what it means to realize you are worthy of love, happiness, and freedom.

Valentina knew then what she wanted to be, more than anything in the world. A heroine; helping other women, having adventures and lifting curses from enchanted princesses.

Everyone, remember this, once upon a time in a place called earth a little novelette called Ripped Pages, written by a woman called Maria Hollis, came out and anyone who knew what is what knew that Ripped Pages was a book to get. Thus, mark your calendars for September 22, 2017, and buy this f/f fairytale as fast as you can.

signature9

Advertisements

ARC Review of The Tiger’s Watch by Julia Ember

thetigerswatch1.png

thetigerswatch1

The Tiger’s Watch by Julia Ember

Publication Date: August 22, 2017.

Publisher: Harmony Ink Press.

Genres: Fantasy and Young Adult.

Rating: 587264602.png587264602.png587264602.png587264602.png

Purchase here: Amazon Book Depository | Harmony Ink Press

Synopsis: Sixteen-year-old Tashi has spent their life training as a inhabitor, a soldier who spies and kills using a bonded animal. When the capital falls after a brutal siege, Tashi flees to a remote monastery to hide. But the invading army turns the monastery into a hospital, and Tashi catches the eye of Xian, the regiment’s fearless young commander.

Tashi spies on Xian’s every move. In front of his men, Xian seems dangerous, even sadistic, but Tashi discovers a more vulnerable side of the enemy commander—a side that draws them to Xian.

When their spying unveils that everything they’ve been taught is a lie, Tashi faces an impossible choice: save their country or the boy they’re growing to love. Though Tashi grapples with their decision, their volatile bonded tiger doesn’t question her allegiances. Katala slaughters Xian’s soldiers, leading the enemy to hunt her. But an inhabitor’s bond to their animal is for life—if Katala dies, so will Tashi.

galaxyreview

Thank you, Julia Ember and Harmony Ink Press, for my ARC of The Tiger’s Watch. I received this ARC in exchange for an honest review; this does not affect my opinion. Any quotes mentioned below are taken from the ARC and are subject to change upon publication.

As Julia Ember’s third published book, The Tiger’s Watch manages to still contain all the things I love about Ember’s work and continue to surprise me with new stories and concepts. The Tiger’s Watch is about Tashi, who is nonbinary, genderfluid, and uses they/them pronouns. Throughout the book, Tashi’s pronouns are respected and the few times someone uses the wrong pronouns for them, it’s immediately called out and corrected. The world we see in The Tiger’s Watch is filled with magic and culture, and Tashi among other selected are inhabitors: “As inhabitors, we all bonded with one animal at the age of eight, and our life force linked to theirs.” At first, the connection between Tashi and their golden tiger Katala reminded me of Sense8 with how they can enter each other’s minds and take over each other’s bodies. In their country, Tashi learned to become an inhabitor at an academy specifically meant for children, poor or orphaned, to be trained to become inhabitors and spies, with the ability to wield their unique magic.

“It was something we all were conditioned to understand, even if most of us never fully accepted it. Once you became an inhabitor and said the words of the binding spell, your soul literally fused with another creature’s. I could access Katala’s memories, feel her emotions, and see what she saw. When she or I died, the one who lived would slip away as Kalx was doing. For me, bonded as I was to a mountain tiger with a projected lifespan of more than thirty years, things didn’t seem so bleak. I could live to be forty or maybe older.”

I think what really makes you connect with The Tiger’s Watch and draws you is the characters, even if your feelings towards them are torn. Tashi really evolved in this book. They still doubt themselves at times, but they also come to the realization that they can be brave despite not always having been so in the past and Katala, their golden tiger and other half, balanced them out in the perfect way. However, it should be mentioned that all characters in this book, including Tashi, can be seen as morally ambiguous. There is no one that is 100 % good or evil, there is both in all of them and that makes the entire story that much more complex and intriguing. It’s a lot harder to know who to root for when you’re on the fence about everyone and their true intentions. I cannot wait to see where the sequel takes us because there is unfinished business, and questions I’m eager to get answers to.

The romance in the book is complex and for me, it was very unexpected. At first, I thought it was going in one direction and then it went into another. I’m still uncertain how I feel about any of the possible pairings that have been explored in this book. Despite this, I do lean more towards one of the pairings and hope it will be further developed in the future (or that maybe a new pairing pops up).

One thing I’d like to point out is that I do not share the marginalizations the main character, Tashi, and a few other the other main characters have. Therefore I cannot speak on the representation in the book. If I find any ownvoices reviews that discuss the representation I will make sure to update my review and include these reviews here.

The Tiger’s Watch is perfect for readers who love unique and diverse fantasy books, especially if you love ones you’ll get through quickly. There are characters you won’t be sure whether you hate or love, and there will probably even be some tears (there was for me). However, The Tiger’s Watch is a great read and I really recommend it.

P.S. A personal side note. I’m so happy, surprised, and grateful that a dream came through with this book; I was mentioned in the acknowledgments of the book. If you’ve read my blog post, Bookish Bucket List Goals, you already knew this was something I’ve always wanted to happen since I honestly think it’s the coolest thing ever. Anywho, I’m so glad to be a reader and supporter of Julia Ember’s books.

signature9

Twelve Diverse Books Flying Under the Radar

diversebooksunderradar1.png

Hi everyone, welcome to my new blog post with a few diverse books I love but feel are underrated and are flying under the radar among book circles. In this blog post, I have 12 diverse books that I’ve read and loved, that also have less than 50 reviews on Amazon. Moreover, some of the books also have less than 100 ratings on Goodreads. I have marked these books with a star (✯). These 12 books are in need of some love, and I hope you’ll find a new gem to read and review among these.

The first four books that I definitely feel need more loving are,

  • Bearly a Lady by Cassandra Khaw (). Goodreads & Amazon link. This book is about a fat bisexual woman of color who also happens to be a werebear and a fashionista. The ship is really cute, and I love how they play scrabble together.
  • Fragile Chaos by Amber R. Duell (). Goodreads & Amazon link. Fragile Chaos is about the god of war and his sacrificial bride. This ship is on fire, there is serious chemistry, and I love the entire world with the gods and goddesses.
  • The Little Queen by Meia Geddes (). Goodreads & Amazon link. This is a novella written in the style of a fairytale about a young queen who goes on adventures to learn about herself and on her journey falls in love with another young girl.
  • The Paths We Choose by Maria Hollis. Goodreads & Amazon link. This book is a new adult story about two girls in a no strings attached relationship who fall in love and find out that there is something more between them.

Continue Reading ➞

SURPRISE: I’m doing #ARCAugust ✯ Featuring My Entire August TBR

arcaugusttbr1.png

Hi, galaxy travelers and readers! As the title of this post suggests, I made a last minute decision to, for the second year in a row, join ARC August hosted by Read.Sleep.Repeat. Last year I thought it went so-so for me since I didn’t read the books I wanted to go through during the month. However, I’m excited to give it another shot this year. Especially since I’m actually reading a lot more this summer. I’m very excited to share my August TBR with you all.

arc-august2.png

The ARCs I want to get through during August are the following,

I have a few ARC requests pending so I might also add a few more books to my TBR before the month is over. I’m really hoping I’ll be accepted for them, but we’ll see how it goes.

Continue Reading ➞

ARC Review of The Little Queen by Meia Geddes

thelittlequeen1.png

thelittlequeen1The Little Queen by Meia Geddes

Publication Date: August 1, 2017.

Publisher: Poetose Press.

Genres: Young Adult, Fiction, and Fantasy.

Rating: 587264602.png587264602.png587264602.png587264602.png

Purchase here: Amazon

Synopsis: When her mother and father pass away, the little queen must figure out how to be a little queen. And so she begins her adventures, journeying away from her palace and into the world to determine how she should go about going on. The little queen soon encounters numerous folks who teach her a thing or two: the book sniffer, the dream writer, and the architect of silence are just a few. Along the way, the little queen finds friendship, love, and meaning in being a leader in her world. The Little Queen is a magical exploration of self-discovery, vocation, community, and home.

galaxyreview

Thank you, Poetose Press, for my eARC of The Little Queen. I received this ARC in exchange for an honest review; this does not affect my opinion. Any quotes mentioned below are taken from the ARC and are subject to change upon publication.

The Little Queen by Meia Geddes starts with two simple sentences that lay the basis for the entire story: “On a little world, upon a little hill, a little tear fell down a little face. A little girl was now a little queen.” The story follows a little queen who lost her parents and is now trying to figure out how she can be a little queen, and if it’s something she can be. She is filled with insecurities and a bit of sadness too. To figure it all out, the little queen goes on several adventures and meets a lot of different women that teach her lessons about life and about who she is. Along the way, she even falls in love with a girl.

“Each of them admired the other’s ears and eyes and smiles, and in that moment both of them knew that they had fallen in love.”

The Little Queen is a book I truly want everyone to read. It is basically the sapphic fairytale everyone deserves in their life. Not only is the story suitable for everyone, both young people and the old, it is also a story I feel will bring light and warmth to everyone who reads it. The story is simple, pure and just beautiful. The Little Queen is a novella, unlike anything I have read before which is also why I fell in love with it. I can with confidence recommend it to everyone who likes fantasy books, to people who love it when a book reads like a fairytale and to everyone who loves a story that is both unique and adorable. The Little Queen is the fairytale we all deserve, one written by a woman of color and is about girls loving other girls. Meia Geddes is definitely on my radar from now on. I want to buy a physical copy of this book just so that I can read it to my children one day if I were to have them.

“When the little queen moved her hands through air and earth and swung her legs forward in long, steady strides, she felt a tingling. Lying in fields, she looked up at the sky and thought how the clouds looked like clusters of stars and how the stars looked like tiny suns.”

I love The Little Queen, the writing is both beautiful and lyrical and the book itself explores topics revolving who and what we are, where we belong in the world, and where we want to go. Moreover, when The Little Queen goes on a journey of self-discovery and love, you find yourself doing the same. The book is feminist and filled with strong women so sure of themselves and I think no matter your age or preferred genre, this book has something to give to everyone. Don’t miss it when The Little Queen by Meia Geddes comes out August 1, 2017.

signature9

ARC Review of Fragile Chaos by Amber R. Duell

fragilechaos2

fragilechaos1.jpgFragile Chaos by Amber R. Duell

Publication Date: July 11, 2017.

Publisher: Radiant Crown Publishing, LLC.

Genres: Young Adult, Mythology, and Fantasy.

Rating: 587264602.png587264602.png587264602.png587264602.png

Purchase here: Amazon

Synopsis: A GOD OF WAR SEEKING RESTORATION.

AN UNWILLING SACRIFICIAL BRIDE.

BETRAYAL THAT COULD DESTROY THEM BOTH.

“Every fiber of my being is woven from the rage of mortals.”

Theodric, the young God of War, has a talent for inciting conflict and bloodshed. After being stripped of his powers by his older brother, King of Gods, he sets out to instigate a mortal war to prove himself worthy of being restored to power.

“I loved Kisk once; it was my home… But that was before. This is now.”

Sixteen-year-old Cassia, like many in the modern era, believes gods and goddesses to be just a myth. Enemy to her country and an orphan of the war, she has no time for fairy tales. That’s until religious zealots from Theo’s sect offer her up as a sacrifice.

Can Cassia and Theo end the mortal war and return balance to the earth and heavens? Or, will their game of fate lead down a path of destruction, betrayal, and romance neither of them saw coming?

galaxyreview

Thank you, Amber R. Duell, for my eARC of Fragile Chaos. I received this ARC in exchange for an honest review; this does not affect my opinion. Any quotes mentioned below are taken from the ARC and are subject to change upon publication.

Fragile Chaos is a book I’m in love with and I’m so happy I had the opportunity to read this one early. It took me a while to get into the story but once I was in, there was no going back for me. The entire concept of Fragile Chaos intrigued me and while I was scared it wouldn’t deliver I can definitely say it did and then some. The story follows Theo, the God of War, and Cassia, a female sacrifice meant to become Theo’s bride. From their first scene, there is a clear connection between the two and the more you see of them, both individually and together, the more invested you become in their fates. If you are a fan of young adult books with strong mythical elements and romance that is fought for then Fragile Chaos is a must read.

“War is a captivating, magnetic disorder. And it’s mine. Only the God of War can decide when and how it ends, and right now I’m perfectly happy to let it rage on despite what my brother wants. He may be older, and the King of the Gods, but this is my decision.”

I love the mythology aspect of the story. In a lot of ways, it reminds me of Greek and Roman mythology. However, despite the similarities, the mythology present in Fragile Chaos is that of its own. In Fragile Chaos, there are six realms of the gods and goddesses and all of the gods are siblings. The siblings are Ebris, the King of the Gods; Drea, the Goddess of Life; Brisa, the Goddess of the Sea; Leander, the God of Death; Astra, the Goddess of Love, and lastly, Theodric, the God of War and the protagonist of the book. The thing about Fragile Chaos is that it feels new and different in comparison to a lot of other books I’ve read based on mythology. First of all, Fragile Chaos focuses on the God of War which I have never seen before. Moreover, the whole world that Amber R. Duell has created is intriguing, draws you in and makes you want to see more of it. I have always loved books that feature gods and goddesses and I’m really happy that Fragile Chaos managed to surprise me, which I didn’t think it’d do. Fragile Chaos is gritty and manages to keep you at the edge of your seat until the very end.

However, what made me really fall in love with Fragile Chaos is definitely the main characters. We have Theo, the God of War, who is misunderstood by his siblings and wants them to see him for who he is, and for them to trust his judgments. Then we have Cassia, who despite being all alone in the world is strong and never gives up without a fight. Both of them are headstrong and have a soft side to them not everyone gets to see and that is what makes them such interesting characters.

To see Theo and Cassia fall in love was seriously a pleasure. My heart was weak the entire time, especially during the moments when Theo turned soft in the presence of Cassia while at the same time everything was on fire between them. The tension between Theo and Cassia was electric, and their chemistry and the way they were around each other throughout the book will make you fangirl. Another aspect of their story that I love was the fact that their love didn’t come easy. They both struggled with their emotions for each other and that made their connection that much deeper in the end. Theo and Cassia made me root for them, fangirl over the way they looked at and thought about each other, and their kissing scenes had me squealing. I just love it when a book does that.

“She collides against my chest. My breathing hitches. Each place her body touches mine feels as if it’s exploding. I push her away, stepping back at the same time, and drag in a breath.”

The one aspect of the story I think could have been written differently is the way Cassia’s skin color is described. She is clearly a woman of color, especially based on the book’s cover. However, in the book her skin color is described as tan and bronze. Tan is a very ambiguous word. Anyone can be tan no matter if your skin color is pink, beige, brown and black etc. and that’s why I thought her skin color could have been described better and therefore clarified. Two quotes from the book that highlights this issue are the following,

A girl in an oversized khaki jacket is sitting at the edge of the firelight’s glow. Shadows flicker over her tan skin, dancing in time to the flames. She can’t be more than sixteen. “Last roll,” she says.

and

My skin is almost as bronze as hers, my hair just as black, and if it weren’t for my blue eyes, I could easily pass as a fellow islander.

All in all, Fragile Chaos is a great young adult book about six gods and goddesses and the world they are a part of, for better and for worse. This book will make you fangirl and root for the protagonists until the very end. Theo and Cassia’s story has its ups and downs, nothing is ever easy for them, but their chemistry is amazing and you will want them to end up together despite all their flaws. If you love a good young adult romance, mythology, and a story with high stakes then you definitely need to read Fragile Chaos by Amber R. Duell.

signature9

Friendship, Fiction, and Coming Out by Marie Landry {A Pride Month Guest Post}

pridemonthguestposts1.png

I started selectively coming out about eleven years ago. I pretty much always knew I wasn’t ‘straight’, but I didn’t know what to call myself, largely because I grew up in a time when calling someone ‘gay’ was considered the funniest/best insult by a lot of people, and I didn’t really know any labels beyond gay and lesbian. For a long time, I figured it would be a part of me I kept mostly to myself, but when I started dating a girl, I knew I needed the people closest to me to know about this side of my life and this important person I loved.

The first person I came out to was my friend Meghan. I don’t remember how I told her. I can’t remember the exact words. I honestly don’t even remember if I did it in person or on MSN Messenger (showing my age here, haha). What I do remember is one of the next times I saw her, she gave me a book: Bottle Rocket Hearts by Zoe Whittall. Meghan was always lending me books – books that often ended up being favourites, like The Alchemist by Paulo Coehlo. When she gave me Bottle Rocket Hearts, a book about 18-year-old Eve, a French-Canadian lesbian, I was grateful, but I don’t think I got her true intentions. I was excited because the book is set in Canada and there are so few books set in my beloved homeland.

It wasn’t until a few years ago, as I found the LGBTQ+ community on Twitter and heard about people’s experiences with coming out that the significance of Meghan’s gift really hit me. It wasn’t just that she was giving me a book she thought I would like. It was her way of saying ‘I love you, I support you, I’m here for you’. I cried when I realized, and I still get teary at times when I think about it. She was the perfect first person to come out to; I couldn’t have asked for a better experience, or a better friend.

Meghan’s thoughtful gift got me thinking about what book I would give a friend who came out to me, or was newly out. I’ve read a lot of LGBTQ+ books, but there are a specific few that come to mind.

Continue Reading ➞

Saturday Night Author Fever #5 with Aubrie Nixon

saturdaynightauthorfever-stars

Hi everyone and welcome to my interview series Saturday Night Author Fever, where I interview authors with a bit of a 70s music and diversity theme. I personally love 70s music, especially disco music, and sometimes on Friday nights when no one is looking you can find me dancing to classic 70s songs such as September, Bennie and the Jets and We Are Family. However, books are my true passion and because of this, I thought it would be a great idea to mix my two loves and start this interview series. The questions will be similar every week, but with a new author every time, and I hope you’ll enjoy the answers as much as I have. Now let’s get this party started!

giphy (1) 2

(gif source)*

This Saturday Night we welcome Aubrie Nixon. Thank you so much for sitting down with me today in my galaxy of books.

Aubrie, can you tell us a bit about yourself and your books? What do you think about 70s music?

My name is Aubrie Nixon, and I am the author of the Age of Endings series. The first book in the series, Secret of Souls is due out this Fall and I am so excited! Its a dark fantasy about an assassin and her journey to bring balance back to her broken world. However she is the type who would rather burn it down. So, it’s definitely an interesting journey she goes on. To answer your question about 70s music, I love it! I often go on road trips with my grandma and we always have it on the 60s and 70s station.

Continue Reading ➞

What To Read Summer of 2017 {Diverse Books Releasing In June, July & August 2017}

diversebookssummer2017.png

Hey there, bookish people! Can you feel the summer vibes in the air? I certainly can. June is unofficially the beginning of summer here in Sweden and you know what’s just the best part about that? All of the free time, lovely weather and the big stack of amazing books you can *finally* devour. To celebrate all of this I thought I would write a blog post with all of the diverse books releasing this summer, in other words, all of the books releasing in June, July and August. There are so many of them and a lot of them are very anticipated reads for me. Do you have a book you’re dying to read this summer?

I’ve tried putting all of the diverse books I could find in this post, however, if I missed one please let me know so I can add it. The plan is to continuously update this post with any releases I might have missed. This summer is long and filled with so many diverse book releases. I can’t wait to read them all. In this list diverse books includes books with marginalized characters and books by marginalized authors, some who may not have diverse characters in their books.

diversebookssummer2017-1diversebookssummer20176booksjune1.png

The books releasing in June are listed below in the order of their release date. All of the Goodreads pages will be linked together with where you can buy/pre-order the book if that option exists.

  • June 1 – The Story of Lizzy and Darcy by Grace Watson. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • June 2 – Mature Content by Megan Erickson & Santino Hassell. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • June 5 – North to You by Tif Marcelo. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • June 6 – Everything All At Once by Katrina Leno. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • June 6 – Follow Me Back by A.V. Geiger. GoodreadsAmazon links.
  • June 6 – Perfect Ten by L. Philips. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • June 6 – Tash Hearts Tolstoy by Kathryn Ormsbee. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • June 8 – Grrrls on the Side by Carrie Pack. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • June 13 – Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body by Roxane Gay. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • June 13 – Saints and Misfits by S. K. Ali. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • June 13 – Want by Cindy Pon. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • June 27 – Girl on the Verge by Pintip Dunn. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • June 27 – If Birds Fly Back by Carlie Sorosiak. Add it on Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • June 27 – The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee. Goodreads & Amazon links.

These are the diverse books set to be published in June. If I missed any, let me know so I can add them right away. If there is a title that doesn’t fit, let me know about that too.

diversebookssummer2017-2diversebookssummer20176booksjuly1.png

Now onto July. The books releasing in July are listed below in the order of their release date. All of the Goodreads pages will be linked together with where you can buy/pre-order the book if that option exists.

  • July 4 – The Tower of the Antilles by Achy Obejas. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • July 6 – After the Sunset by Lilah Suzanne. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • July 11 – Refuge by Dina Nayeri. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • July 11 – Goodbye, Vitamin by Rachel Khong. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • July 11 – Fragile Chaos by Amber R. Duell. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • July 18 – The Library of Fates by Aditi Khorana. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • July 20 – Brush Strokes by E.S. Karlquist. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • July 25 – Spirit Hunters by Ellen Oh. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • July 25 – Hate to Want You by Alisha Rai. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • July 25 – Lucky in Love by Kasie West. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • July 25 – The Gallery of Unfinished Girls by Lauren Karcz. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • July 25 – Solo by Kwame Alexander & Mary Rand Hess. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • July 25 – Daughter of the Burning City by Amanda Foody. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • July 26 – Walking on Knives by Maya Chhabra. Goodreads link.

These are the diverse books set to be published in July. If I missed any, let me know so I can add them right away. If there is a title that doesn’t fit, let me know about that too.

diversebookssummer2017-3diversebookssummer20176booksaugust1.png

Lastly, we have August. The books releasing in August are listed below in the order of their release date. All of the Goodreads pages will be linked together with where you can buy/pre-order the book if that option exists.

  • August 1 – New People by Danzy Senna. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • August 1 – Sour Heart: Stories by Jenny Zhang. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • August 3 – Absolutely, Almost, Perfect by Lissa Reed. Goodreads and Amazon links.
  • August 8 – Little & Lion by Brandy Colbert. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • August 8 – The Hearts We Sold by Emily Lloyd-Jones. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • August 8 – The Authentics by Abdi Nazemian. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • August 8 – The Epic Crush of Genie Lo by F.C. Yee. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • August 15 – Illegal Contact by Santino Hassell. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • August 15 – Home Fire: A Novel by Kamila Shamsie. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • August 17 – Blended Notes by Lilah Suzanne. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • August 22 – The Tiger’s Watch by Julia Ember. Goodreads link.
  • August 22 – The First Rule of Punk by Celia C. Pérez. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • August 29 – Dress Codes for Small Towns by Courtney C. Stevens. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • August 29 – Starswept by Mary Fan. Goodreads & Amazon links.
  • August 29 – You Don’t Know Me But I Know You by Rebecca Barrow. Goodreads & Amazon links.

These are the diverse books set to be published in August. If I missed any, let me know so I can add them right away. If there is a title that doesn’t fit, let me know about that too.

Disclaimer: I haven’t read all of these books so I cannot speak for the representation present in them. However, if you know that any of these books are problematic please let me know so I can delete them from this list.

Do you have a specific book release you’re excited about this summer? Do you know of one I missed?

signature9

#BroodyBFF Challenge 1: Once Upon a Time a Main Character and her Brooding YA Hero met …

Hey everyone, today I have a special blog post for you all. I was chosen to be a part of the #BroodyBFF street team to promote @BroodingYAHero and his upcoming novel, Brooding YA Hero’s Guide to Achieving Main Character Status so today I have a Broody McHottiepants blog post for you. Expect a lot more blog posts about him and his book in the future. Today I’m gonna tell you the story of how I met this brooding YA hero.

broodychallenge1-1

Once upon a time, a young girl* met a broody boy in a far away land where the birds are constantly tweeting and the sun is always shining. They call this land Twitterland. This girl would follow this broody boy everywhere and love all parts of him, even the more questionable ones.

This young girl would love this broody hero, get lost in his emerald green eyes and forget all of her old friends. He was her whole world. Friends, who? Family, what? It was the two of them against the world. Despite a second guy entering the picture, his allure tempting, in the end, the only guy in this young girl’s heart was Broody McHottiepants. He was the only YA Hero to ever steal her heart away.

Looking back, it all started a sunny fall day almost two** years ago. The young girl was strolling through a feed of tweets, deep in thought over how ordinary she was in comparison to all the other girls in the world. That’s when she first saw him, Broody McHottiepants, the boy about to become the hero to her heroine. A simple retweet, a loud laugh, and their fates were forever sealed. The click of the follow button that day would change their futures forever. Broody, with his bad boy vibes and heart only soft for one girl, was the key to this heroine’s character development. Together they would overthrow an evil force working against them while riding a ridiculously dangerous motorcycle, their chemistry like thunder on a dark summer night. This main character and her brooding YA hero would walk hand in hand towards their happily ever after, or so the story would like for you to believe, for now…

broodychallenge1-2

*the girl was 19 years old, perhaps not that young after all. 

**or so she thinks. When it’s a story about true love, the epic kind where the clouds separate to make room for the sun, is accuracy really that important?

Now I’m sure you’re thinking, where can I find my very own Broody McHottiepants? Worry not, fellow protagonists, there is a @BroodingYAHero out there for everyone and you can follow him just like I did.


Brooding YA Hero’s Guide to Achieving Main Character Status by Carrie Ann DiRisio & Broody McHottiepants. Add on Goodreads.

Have you ever wished you could receive a little guidance from your favorite book boyfriend? Ever dreamed of being the Chosen One in a YA novel? Want to know all the secrets of surviving the dreaded plot twist?

Or maybe you’re just really confused about what “opal-tinted, luminous cerulean orbs” actually are?

Well, popular Twitter personality @broodingYAhero is here to help as he tackles the final frontier in his media dominance: writing a book. Join Broody McHottiepants as he attempts to pen Brooding YA Hero’s Guide to Achieving Main Character Status, a “self-help” guide (with activities–you always need activities) that lovingly pokes fun at the YA tropes that we roll our eyes at, but secretly love.

As his nefarious ex, Blondie DeMeani, attempts to thwart him at every turn, Broody overcomes to detail, among other topics, how to choose your genre, how to keep your love interest engaged (while maintaining lead character status), his secret formula for guaranteed love triangle success, and how to make sure you secure that sequel, all while keeping his hair perfectly coiffed and never breaking a sweat.


Have you met your @BroodingYAHero yet? If yes, how did you meet him?

signature9